piano pieces

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etude12
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piano pieces

Postby etude12 » Fri Dec 12, 2008 1:59 am

I am trying to decide what to learn as a real show-piece; I need something extremely difficult. I am terribly indecisive, since there is so much amazing music, but I also have to deal with the constraints of my hands.
I am a teenage girl, so I haven't got Richter-esque hands; quite the contrary, for I can span only a ninth. I probably need something very fiddly as opposed to "great", but I want it to be 15 minutes long (approximately) and also moving emotionally.
I just thought that I would give this a shot and see what came up.
etude12

dwil9798
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Postby dwil9798 » Mon Dec 15, 2008 9:18 pm

Beethoven's sonatas are always a good bet. His Sonata No. 23, Op. 57, aka the 'Appassionata' is quite difficult, and is also very emotional, particularly the 2nd movement. His Eighth, the 'Pathetique' is not his most difficult, but probably the most serious and emotional. Other than those check out Chopin's nocturnes, Mazaurkas, and Impromptus (although not very long, they are best heard in sets of 2 or 3), and Lizst's Hungarian Rhapsodies (the same goes for them). Good luck!

etude12
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piano pieces

Postby etude12 » Mon Dec 15, 2008 10:08 pm

I hope this message goes to the right place... I am dreadful on computers.
Thanks... I have learned Beethoven's Sonata Pathetique, Op.110, Op.10 no.2, and I have been working on the Apassionata! Oh well!
I also have much Chopin, but I am fairly frightened of learning Liszt, for such a fuss is made over him and the fact that you need to be "ready" that I just prefer to avoid him and wallow in Bach, Beethoven, Chopin, Brahms... many others.
I have decided to learn Beethoven's Bagatelles Op.126, Liszt's Transcription of Beethoven's 5th Symphony (not overly Listian), Chopin's Scherzo no.2 (how original!) and Brahms' Op.118 (if only for the gorgeous intermezzo no.6!) and Pour le piano or Suite Bergamasque by Debussy- I haven't decided yet. Oh, possibly the Busoni arrangement of Bach's Chaconne BWV 1004, but perhaps in a few months!
Many thanks, but my indecisive mind has finally (almost) settled on something!
etude12

goldberg988
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Postby goldberg988 » Mon Dec 15, 2008 10:36 pm

My opinion:

I think a student should challenge his or herself with technically difficult pieces by Liszt, etc. as soon as possible. As long as the basics of mechanism at the piano are working well, there is no need to wait until you are "ready". On the contrary, I find that it takes a great deal of maturity to approach works by Beethoven, Mozart, Brahms, and the more inspired works of Schumann and Chopin. They should be reserved until after the technique is fully acquired (they may of course be studied, but perhaps not performed). Op.110 of Beethoven is a particularly inspired work of art, and should only be played by the most mature of artists. Again, this is merely my opinion.


I recommend for you Liszt's Mephisto Waltz. Other good works to consider: Schumann Toccata (be careful not to over-strain), etudes by Liszt, Rachmaninoff preludes and etudes.

Lyle Neff
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Postby Lyle Neff » Tue Dec 16, 2008 12:01 am

If you don't want to try Liszt, you can't fail with Balakirev.

Islamey has a reputation as "the most difficult" piano piece, but I'd go with the Sonata in B-flat Minor instead. 8)
"A libretto, a libretto, my kingdom for a libretto!" -- Cesar Cui (letter to Stasov, Feb. 20, 1877)

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Postby Carolus » Tue Dec 16, 2008 6:23 am

Just to add a general comment to Lyle's fine point about the Balakirev, there's quite a body of very interesting Russian piano literature from the same general period. Lyapunov was one of the real technical virtuosi whose work was influenced by that of Liszt. IMSLP has a very nice collection, too.

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Postby vinteuil » Tue Dec 16, 2008 2:49 pm

Also, if you're up to it, Brahms' Paganini variations are seriously difficult and showy - but maybe the third piano sonata instead (easier)

etude12
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Postby etude12 » Sun Dec 21, 2008 12:24 am

Ah, the Paganini Variations by Brahms. Many a time I have played that! Not in performance of course, but when I need cheering up! I love the third piano sonata by Brahms... am not that great a fan of the previous two.
Thanks, all those who have made suggestions; I will follow your suggestions up when my computer is capable of downloading again!
etude12

babybopqueen
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good piano pieces

Postby babybopqueen » Tue Jan 13, 2009 3:23 am

i remember there are good piano pieces available on this learning piano review site


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